Brioche dough for beignet and cinnamon rolls

I discovered Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day a couple of years ago, and I have never once regretted getting it. I am sometimes confused and perplexed by their instructions (you’ll see an example of that in this post), but for the most part they are spot on.

The idea behind the book is that one can have freshly-baked bread whenever they want it as long as they make bulk dough recipes. It pretty much works out that if you make a bulk batch of, say, honey wheat bread on the weekend, you’ll have fresh bread to accompany dinner throughout the week. And the recipes are really nicely scalable, too, in case you don’t necessarily want to have a five quart bucket of dough sitting in your fridge.

I haven’t yet played around with all of the recipes – I feel the need to master the few that I have tried before trying more complex ones. My dough is almost never just right – I tend to worry that I will over-rise it, so my tendency is toward under-risen dough. It tends to come out dense, rather than that nice almost fluffy texture you’ll find in a good baguette. Once I figure out how to make it rise appropriately, I will surely celebrate on here and all the interwebs will know that I can finally make a good loaf of bread.

In the meantime, I have discovered the following recipe for brioche dough in the book, and it’s amazing. It’s my go-to dough for cinnamon or any other type of swirly-roll and beignets. This morning I’m making spinach turkey and cheese rolls because we have some spinach that isn’t quite as happy as it should be. Mikal has also promised to make caramel rolls with my failed caramels if only I would make the dough. The dough is made – and already niftily portioned out into batchy-clumps for easy use.

Brioche Dough

from Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day

Note: The original recipe as posted makes four 1 lb loaves. Considering I forget it is sitting in the fridge half the time, I tend to halve the recipe – it’s a pretty easy split. 

1 1/2 cups lukewarm water
1 1/2 tbsp granulated yeast (2 packets)
1 1/2 tbsp Kosher salt
8 eggs, lightly beaten
1/2 cup honey
1 1/2 cups (3 sticks) butter, melted
7 1/2 cups unbleached flour

Mix the yeast, salt, eggs, honey and melted butter with the water in a 5-quart bowl, or a lidded (not airtight) food container.

Mix in the flour without kneading, using a spoon, a 14-cup capacity food processor (with the dough attachment), or a heavy-duty stand mixer (with the dough hook). If you’re not using a machine, you may need to wet hands to incorporate the last bit of flour. The dough will be loose but will firm up when chilled; don’t try to work with it before chilling. (You may notice lumps in the dough but they will disappear in the finished products.)

Loosely cover the dough and let rest at room temperature for a couple of hours or until the dough rises and falls. Stick dough into the refrigerator to chill and firm.

You can use the dough once it is chilled to the point of being firm enough to handle comfortably. I tend to put it in overnight – the first time I made it I under-chilled it; really bad idea, seriously messy and sticky.

From here the dough can go a few different places. To make the spinach rolls, I took about a third of the half-batch I did, rolled it out to about 1/8″ thick, and sprinkled with garlic powder, cayenne, grated cheddar cheese, turkey sandwich meat slices, spinach, and more cheese. It will be a bit annoying to roll together, but I rolled and sliced them and put them into muffin pan cavities. I have never been one for pulling cinnamon rolls out of a pan – too sticky/messy and they tend to look less than perfect once they are out of the pan. With the spinach rolls, it just makes more sense to do singles anyway. Also, if you notice that the dough is a bit hard to handle (warmed, that is), you can chill it before attempting to slice it.

Once the rolls are cut and roll-ish, loosely cover and let rise for an hour if chilled, 40 mins if you were brave and let the dough warm up before rolling out. Preheat the oven to 350°F, and bake for ~40 minutes or until yummy-looking.


Sadly, I took the rolls downstairs to the office before getting a picture of them – and of course they have been devoured. Why do I do this every time and expect to miraculously get different results? Because I am crazy.

Perhaps I will have the opportunity to share pictures of the caramel rolls Mikal will make. (hint)

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